Project Alternatives, Summary and Next Steps

Project Alternatives

In preparing the EA, the Navy studied a range of reasonable alternatives and options for accomplishing the Proposed Action, as well as a “no action alternative.”

 

ALTERNATIVE 1 Under Alternative 1, the Navy would construct up to 3,400 feet of buried pipeline. Approximately 2,250 feet of the existing pipeline would be cleared and closed in place.

• High Tech High Encroachment (Proposed Option 1): This alternative would realign the pipeline on the north side of Mt. Alifan Drive and west side Mt. Acadia Boulevard by constructing new underground pipeline segments within the City of San Diego right-of-way (see Figure 2, Proposed Option 1).

• Cannington Drive Encroachment (Proposed Option 1): This alternative includes constructing new pipeline to connect to the existing pipeline near the intersection of Printwood Way and Mt. Abernathy Avenue and would run approximately 2,650 feet through segments of Printwood Way and Cannington Drive, generally between Mt. Abernathy Avenue and Liebel Court (see Figure 3, Proposed Option 1)

 

ALTERNATIVE 2 Under Alternative 2, the Navy would construct up to 3,365 feet of buried pipeline. Approximately 2,210 feet of the existing pipeline would be cleared and closed in place.

• High Tech High Encroachment (Proposed Option 2): This alternative includes the realignment of the pipeline on the south side of Mt. Alifan Drive (versus the north side under Alternative 1) and east side of Mt. Acadia Boulevard (versus the west side under Alternative 1) by constructing new underground pipeline segments within the City of San Diego right-of-way (see Figure 2, Proposed Option 2).

• Cannington Drive Encroachment (Proposed Option 1): The pipeline realignment for the Cannington Drive encroachment would be the same as described under Alternative 1.

 

ALTERNATIVE 3 Under Alternative 3, the Navy would construct up to 3,170 feet of buried pipeline. Approximately 1,965 feet of the existing pipeline would be cleared and closed in place.

• High Tech High Encroachment (Proposed Option 1): The pipeline realignment for the High Tech High encroachment would be the same as described under Alternative 1.

• Cannington Drive Encroachment (Proposed Option 2): This alternative would run the new pipeline through Mt. Abernathy Avenue and Cannington Drive to connect to the existing pipeline located south of the intersection of Mt. Abernathy Avenue and Cannington Drive. To address this encroachment, approximately 2,420 feet of new pipeline would be placed underground within the City of San Diego right-of-way. The new pipeline would be placed underground on the west side of Mt. Abernathy.

 

ALTERNATIVE 4 Under Alternative 4, the Navy would construct up to 3,135 feet of buried pipeline. Approximately 1,925 feet of the existing pipeline would be cleared and closed in place.

• High Tech High Encroachment (Proposed Option 2): The pipeline realignment for the High Tech High encroachment would be the same as described under Alternative 2 (see Figure 2, Proposed Option 2).

• Cannington Drive Encroachment (Proposed Option 2): The pipeline realignment for the Cannington Drive encroachment would be the same as described under Alternative 3.

 

NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE Under the No Action Alternative, the Navy would not realign the pipeline. The pipeline would continue to operate within 10 feet of the High Tech High building, under a residence on Cannington Drive, and under several other properties. The No Action Alternative would not meet the purpose of and need for the Proposed Action to improve access for inspection, maintenance, and repair. Access is important to maintain long-term safe operations. The Navy evaluated the No Action Alternative to provide a baseline for measuring the environmental impacts of the action alternatives, as required.

 

Summary of Draft EA Analysis

The Navy prepared a Draft EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with realigning two segments of the existing Miramar Pipeline in Clairemont Mesa. In the Draft EA, the Navy evaluated the potential impacts the Proposed Action and alternatives may have on the following environmental resource areas.

 

AIR QUALITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE Construction activities would result in emissions of air pollutants; however, air pollutants would be at levels that would not result in adverse impacts on air quality or greenhouse gases.

 

LAND USE Permanent changes to land use would not occur and the Navy does not propose new land uses; however, temporary inconveniences, such as transportation impacts or blocked access to driveways, may occur during construction.

 

NOISE Construction activities would generate noise from the operation of equipment and vehicles; however, noise would be localized, short-term, and intermittent as construction moves along the pipeline alignment. The Navy would comply with all City of San Diego noise ordinances to reduce impacts.

 

TRANSPORTATION Construction activities could potentially block driveway access and reduce roadway access (requiring detours), on-street parking, and pedestrian facilities. However, these impacts would be temporary. The Navy would also implement a traffic control plan to minimize construction impacts. Open trenches would be covered with metal plates, or backfilled and paved, at the end of each workday to allow for vehicle traffic and driveway access. Sidewalks are not anticipated to be affected during construction and would remain open and accessible to pedestrians.

 

PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY Realignment of the pipeline would enhance the overall safety, reliability, and integrity of the pipeline by minimizing the potential for future pipe leaks or breaks. The Navy would implement safety procedures to prevent and minimize potential risk to human health and the environment from construction and pipeline operation.

 

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND WASTES Construction activities would not result in an increase in human health risk or environmental exposure to hazardous materials or hazardous wastes. Hazardous materials would be handled in accordance with applicable regulations. The Navy would implement a management plan to minimize impacts on soils and groundwater. CUMULATIVE IMPACTS Implementation of the Proposed Action, combined with the past, present, and reasonably foreseeable future projects, would not result in significant impacts on any resource area.

 

Next Steps

After completion of the Final EA, the Navy will determine the next steps in the NEPA process. If the findings indicate environmental impacts would be significant, the Navy would conduct additional analyses and prepare an Environmental Impact Statement. Alternatively, if the findings indicate that impacts would not be significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact would be prepared and signed. All environmental impact analyses, including consideration of public comments, would be completed and approvals and permits obtained before the Navy would move forward with the Proposed Action.


Commander, Navy Region Southwest   |   750 Pacific Highway   |   San Diego, CA 92132
Official U.S. Navy Website